Posts Tagged ‘PowerShell’

Change XenApp 6.5 edition via PowerShell

Written by Ingmar Verheij on March 5th, 2012. Posted in PowerShell

If you wanted to change the product edition (Advanced / Enterprise / Platinum) of a Citrix XenApp (4, 5 of 6.0) server this was done per server. How you can change the product edition is explained in this article on Citrix Blogs. In Citrix XenApp 6.0 this was done either via the console of via a PowerShell cmdlet called Set-XAServerEdition.  Since the product edition in XenApp 6.5 is no longer set  per server (but via a Policy) this cmdlet is removed.

Remote desktop to XenServer VM via PowerShell

Written by Ingmar Verheij on February 14th, 2012. Posted in PowerShell, XenServer

Recently I wrote a PowerShell script that connects to the console of a virtual machine on a Citrix XenServer, without using XenCenter or the Web Self Service portal. This allowed me to offer a published application to my users so they can connect to the console session. But what if they want to connect via a Remote Desktop Connection (RDP)?

I’ve written a PowerShell script that looks up the IP address of the VM and connects via RDP.

Connect to VM without XenCenter

Written by Ingmar Verheij on February 2nd, 2012. Posted in PowerShell, XenServer

Author: Ingmar Verheij

If you want to connect to the console of a virtual machine running on Citrix XenServer you either need XenCenter or the Web Self Service portal.

I created a PowerShell script that connects to the console of the virtual machine, without the use of both. This script can be used to offer a shortcut to a virtual machine without requiring the user to have XenCenter installed, or having a XenServer Enterprise or Platinum license (it works with the free license).

RE: Installing Windows Features with Windows PowerShell

Written by Ingmar Verheij on February 17th, 2010. Posted in Deployment, PowerShell

Recently my colleague Robin Plomp wrote an article about installing features in Window Server 2008 R2 (or Windows 7) with Windows PowerShell scripts:

“I ‘m a big fan of the new version of the Windows server platform. I’ve recently deployed 6 Windows 2008 (64) R2 servers. On one of the servers I am going to install Microsoft Office Communicator 2007 R2. One of the prerequisites is .NET Framework 3.5 SP1. This can be installed in the ServerManager under Features. This means you have to scroll down a long list of Windows Features. There has to be an easier way.
Enter the world of Windows PowerShell!”

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Although PowerShell is a great tool for installing features, or performing other tasks, it isn’t necessary for automated installation of features.
Enter the world op “Deployment Image Servicing and Management(DISM)” or dism.exe (located in the system folder)!!!

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