Deploy Citrix Unattended: EdgeSight

Written by Ingmar Verheij on March 8th, 2012. Posted in Citrix, Performance testing

Most Citrix products can be installed unattended using command-line switches. This way you can automate the deployment of the product and decreases the administrative tasks (and prevents human errors).

I’ve collected online resources per product group and wrote them down in this article. Is something missing or do you have an addition (maybe your own blog article)? Let me know and I’ll add it to this article.

 

Product Group

Deploy Citrix Unattended: Receiver and plug-ins

Written by Ingmar Verheij on March 8th, 2012. Posted in Citrix, XenApp (Presentation Server)

Most Citrix products can be installed unattended using command-line switches. This way you can automate the deployment of the product and decreases the administrative tasks (and prevents human errors).

I’ve collected online resources per product group and wrote them down in this article. Is something missing or do you have an addition (maybe your own blog article)? Let me know and I’ll add it to this article.

 

Product Group

Damn you C-states! (Unexpected XenServer reboot)

Written by Ingmar Verheij on February 21st, 2012. Posted in XenServer

Processors have the ability to save energy by entering a low-power mode. Each processor has serveral power modes called “C-states”. The C-states are introduced with the 486DX4 processor and are still present in the current processors. Over time more C-states are introduced to lower the power consumption and save energy.

Hypervisors (used to virtualize desktops or servers) like Citrix XenServers or Microsoft Hyper-V can have issues with  C-states causing them to freeze, BSOD or slow down. This happens when C-state 3 “Sleep” or higher is enabled the BIOS.

Remote desktop to XenServer VM via PowerShell

Written by Ingmar Verheij on February 14th, 2012. Posted in PowerShell, XenServer

Recently I wrote a PowerShell script that connects to the console of a virtual machine on a Citrix XenServer, without using XenCenter or the Web Self Service portal. This allowed me to offer a published application to my users so they can connect to the console session. But what if they want to connect via a Remote Desktop Connection (RDP)?

I’ve written a PowerShell script that looks up the IP address of the VM and connects via RDP.

Connect to VM without XenCenter

Written by Ingmar Verheij on February 2nd, 2012. Posted in PowerShell, XenServer

Author: Ingmar Verheij

If you want to connect to the console of a virtual machine running on Citrix XenServer you either need XenCenter or the Web Self Service portal.

I created a PowerShell script that connects to the console of the virtual machine, without the use of both. This script can be used to offer a shortcut to a virtual machine without requiring the user to have XenCenter installed, or having a XenServer Enterprise or Platinum license (it works with the free license).

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