Posts Tagged ‘operations manager’

No data collected from HP EVA

Written by Ingmar Verheij on July 25th, 2011. Posted in Operations Manager

16 MegaBytes Hard DiskRecently I wrote a management pack to retrieve capacity data from a HP Enterprise Virtual Array (EVA) in System Center Operations Manager (SCOM). Recently I found out that no data is collected.

Execution of the Python script resulted in the following error:

SCOM: Change alert owner fails from non AD joined machine

Written by Ingmar Verheij on April 20th, 2011. Posted in Operations Manager

In System Center Operations Manager 2007 R2 (SCOM) alerts and warnings are generated and collected in the ‘Active Alerts’ view. A useful function is the ability to assign an alert to a user, this enables the IT department to delegate the alerts to specific administrators. This way a storage administrator can solve the storage problems, and the DBA’s can solve database alerts.

In the properties of an alert (or warning) a field Owner is present. Next to the field a button ‘Change’ which opens a search dialog for looking up users in Active Directory. Although the AD search is optional (you can type each value without verification) you do need a domain joined computer for this feature.

Install SCOM 2007R2 on SQL 2008R2 (including reporting server)

Written by Ingmar Verheij on February 21st, 2011. Posted in Microsoft SQL, Operations Manager

When installing the Microsoft System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) 2007 R2 database on a Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 the installation failes because a prerequisite is not met:

This is caused by an outdated installer which doesn’t recoginize SQL 2008R2. Altough installing on SQL 2005 / 2008 will prevent this message there is an alternative.

Maintenance mode

Written by Ingmar Verheij on October 20th, 2010. Posted in Nagios / GroundWork, Operations Manager

Monitoring servers, services and connections is great. It enables pro-active management, notification and escalation and improves root cause analysis.

One big challenge is the number of notifications being sent and the relevance of those notifications. A well set-up environment sents notifications when problems raise or a negative trend is detected. Signals for the Administrator to get out of his lazy chair.
Most environments, however, sent more notifications then needed and are often irrelevant. This causes a negative effect, the mailbox fills up rapidly and the value of the message decrease.

An example of a not well-planned monitoring environment is a reboot schedule. Especially when terminal servers are periodically rebooted, or re-deployed, servers maybe be unreachable once in a while. The monitoring software assumes the server is in trouble and would cause an alert and sent notifications.

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